South Korean Presidential Candidate Pledges to End Internet Explorer’s Monopoly

Local Internet users are “forced” to rely on Internet Explorer

  IE is currently the only browser used in South Korea for online transactions
Ahn Cheol-soo, a South Korean presidential candidate, said in a statement that he wants to end Internet Explorer’s monopoly in the country and let companies choose the security platform they wish to rely on.

Ahn Cheol-soo, a South Korean presidential candidate, said in a statement that he wants to end Internet Explorer’s monopoly in the country and let companies choose the security platform they wish to rely on.

An Internet security system established in South Korea forces banks, companies and government organizations to use the Active X framework, which is solely available in Internet Explorer.

Consumers who want to use online banking or access government websites have no other option than to deploy Internet Explorer, AP writes. But that’s going to be changed if Ahn is elected the new South Korean president.

“South Korea's unique certificate system, driven by the government, has led to the isolation of South Korea's IT,” Ahn said, pointing out that his government would encourage the development of alternative security platforms. “Excessive use of Active X is making web browsing less convenient.”

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